GILLIAN

Wheels with wings, stamps with wings or an ornate hawks wing are representative images that I have worked with to express fleeting movement.  Considering my fascination with these images it was fun to walk by a shoe store in my neighborhood, the type that often has a line out the door for limited release sneakers, that had these shoes in the window! Adidas has a collection designed by Jeremy Scott which incorporates sculpted wings adorning the shoe.  It is a lovely and playful design. I can’t wait to spot these on a sidewalk putting a spring into someone’s step. 

In a recent Facebook post,  Elizabeth Alexander Studio also noted the trend; art imitating life imitating art. I’m looking forward to more fashion pieces with wings!

Learn how to weld at my studio!  I’ve started teaching welding lessons on
Friday Evenings from 5-8 pm. Use metal-working tools such as an Oxy-Acetylene torch, a MIG welder, and a Plasma cutter in order to weld and work with steel.    We will explore a variety of techniques to learn how a welder works.  We will create a small sculpture and work safely with hand tools.  Various finishing methods will also be utilized as well.
$90 per class includes materials, safety goggles and earplugs.  Invite your friends and split the cost! 3 people maximum per class.

Recommended reading if you’re interested in learning more: DIY Welding by Jackson Morley

The ICA nailed it! The spring shows feature Nick Cave, William Kentridge: The Refusal of Time (above) and Nathalie Djurberg + Hans Berg: A World of Glass.  I was on cloud nine as I walked around enjoying the sculptures, animation effects, and sounds.  These three exhibitions delighted the senses.

The ICA nailed it! The spring shows feature Nick Cave, William Kentridge: The Refusal of Time (above) and Nathalie Djurberg + Hans Berg: A World of Glass.  I was on cloud nine as I walked around enjoying the sculptures, animation effects, and sounds.  These three exhibitions delighted the senses.

Studio Visit with Hannah Burr

I saw Hannah Burr’s work at the MFA in 2012 before I met her.  I was happy to discover that she had a studio at Humphreys Street Studio and made my way to meet her.   The exhibit that I saw, “Fresh Eyes” at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston was a year long project where she worked with students to view art at the museum and respond to it using the Visual Thinking Strategies method among other kinds of open-ended inquiry that helps people trust their own response when viewing art.  Burr is motivated and inspired by inquiry based processes, including VTS and meditation practice. 

This high level of observation is evident in her earlier projects as well.  In 2003 Burr observed situations in a cafe, whether it was others in the cafe smiling or a dish being clinked.  She made notations on the spot, and then translated them into marks on paper and wood to create visible traces of fleeting actions.

For her there are two facets to this cataloging; awareness of what’s happening, but also an acknowledgement that there is a certain level of ridiculousness to this pursuit.

Her early work focused on landscapes and representative paintings.  She noticed that her paintings were becoming more abstract as marks turned to text. “Field Notes” developed into a series of envelopes that she made markings on which appeared on some as faded text or incoherent cursive resembling landscape that were sent through the USPS and returned with their markings or red stamp, “Return to Sender” or “No such Person.” She then made some of her own red stamps or left some envelopes at cafes for people to send or open.  The return of all of the notes developed into a larger sculptural stack.

Burr tweezes out actions in everyday situations and brings these to life with her artwork.  Whether registered in a sketchbook, recorded through a marking system or gathered into written form, Burr practices noticing/awareness as part of her walking around meditation practice.  As I approached her studio and contemplated whether or not to knock (not wanting to interrupt an artist at work) she opened the door without me knocking.  I like to think that she is good at opening doors at the right time.  Hannah Burr can be found working in her studio at Humphreys Street Studios most days between 2-8 pm.  She recently completed a book, “Contemporary Prayers”, which can be found here

Hannah Burr is a multifaceted artist, whether she’s making fine art works, posting to her Good Bonfire blog or continuing with Inquiry Practice through teaching and consulting. She is currently working towards a solo show in June, and bringing all branches of her work together in a more unified hannahburr.com which should be ready at the end of March. While it is a work in progress, all facets center on the theme of awareness practice in some way.

In preparation for my next solo show at Boston Sculptors Gallery I have been considering placement of artwork, space, flow and especially how visitor will experience the whole.  In On Being Sculptor, Ann Hamilton was interviewed by Krista Tippett discussing "Sacred," an exhibition that was on view last summer at Minneapolis Institute of Arts. 

Krista Tippett allows a conversation to evolve during her interviews, so about thirty minutes in she opened the discussion to the sacred and experiencing art.  Tippett poses that there is  “some similarity between the atmosphere of explicitly sacred places and the atmosphere in a museum.  How many spaces in this culture do we stand silently, and take something in…and soak in beauty - be in awe of that?”

Ann Hamilton replies, “
When you go through the doors, like the doors of a church you enter that threshold and it’s a different space and…You’re willing to just sit and be.  I think that we come needing that, to the museums.”

I’m considering this gallery space, which is a special space.  I’m hoping to invite and allow people to ‘just sit and be.’

See the entire 2012 "Waves of Grain" exhibition here.

Close to Chuck at the Boston Ballet combined music by Philip Glass and a self-portrait by Chuck Close as the backdrop for the first ballet.  The ballerinas were undoubtedly fantastic to watch.  While Russell worried about the storyline and deeper themes of the three ballets I simply let myself go enjoying the dancing, graceful bodies in motion and set design. 
My mom was recently at a show where she said she was so enthralled by the sets and the lighting that that was about all she watched.  Similarly here, I found that a lot of my delight was in the set design and lighting in the second and third ballets.  A few posts back I discussed sculptor Antony Gormley’s work. The way the set played with cubes, rectangular panels and the curtain to visually box in and highlight the dancer was great and it really reminded me of Gormley’s interactive work.  The dancers even engaged and danced with the curtains at some points.  This is quite a show and I would recommend checking it out- just don’t get too caught up in the ‘storyline.’

Close to Chuck at the Boston Ballet combined music by Philip Glass and a self-portrait by Chuck Close as the backdrop for the first ballet.  The ballerinas were undoubtedly fantastic to watch.  While Russell worried about the storyline and deeper themes of the three ballets I simply let myself go enjoying the dancing, graceful bodies in motion and set design. 

My mom was recently at a show where she said she was so enthralled by the sets and the lighting that that was about all she watched.  Similarly here, I found that a lot of my delight was in the set design and lighting in the second and third ballets.  A few posts back I discussed sculptor Antony Gormley’s work. The way the set played with cubes, rectangular panels and the curtain to visually box in and highlight the dancer was great and it really reminded me of Gormley’s interactive work.  The dancers even engaged and danced with the curtains at some points.  This is quite a show and I would recommend checking it out- just don’t get too caught up in the ‘storyline.’

The Carhartt photo shoot was last week at the studio!  The company shoots real people doing real work, so I hammered, sanded and moved steel around working in four outfits while the ten person crew captured the looks.  Roe Photo has amazing work so check out more shots here. I can’t wait to see the Fall 2014 Lookbook and new collection.  

"Morning"
84” h x 20” w x 10” d
Steel
2014

"Morning"

84” h x 20” w x 10” d

Steel

2014

Bud Sketches

Bud Sketches