GILLIAN

Sculpture No.11, “Ocean’s Wind” takes shape.  Leaves will be added today.

Sculpture No.11, “Ocean’s Wind” takes shape.  Leaves will be added today.

Inspiration of tree and stainless steel parts.  Ready to weld them together onto small sculpture No. 11 today!

Embrace, The Smokestack Project | Americans for the Arts

The Year in Review Database is online now! The Public Art Network, Year in Review recognizes the Best in Public Art Projects annually.  The new database contains information on the public art projects recognized nationally from 2006-2013.  Have fun checking out some cool public artworks!

Here is one of the twelve small sculptures I have been working on that adorn those stainless steel boxes I blogged about in May.  With this piece I am inspired by the salt tolerant marsh grasses growing in the Back Bay Fens.  As the grasses sway in the breeze, I often stop most mornings during my run to admire them.
With three more of these to complete I am nearing the end of the series and feeling ready for my upcoming solo exhibition, "Course" at Boston Sculptors Gallery on view October 8 - November 9, 2014.
Tall Grasses, Stainless Steel, 25” h x 8” w x 6” d

Here is one of the twelve small sculptures I have been working on that adorn those stainless steel boxes I blogged about in May.  With this piece I am inspired by the salt tolerant marsh grasses growing in the Back Bay Fens.  As the grasses sway in the breeze, I often stop most mornings during my run to admire them.

With three more of these to complete I am nearing the end of the series and feeling ready for my upcoming solo exhibition, "Course" at Boston Sculptors Gallery on view October 8 - November 9, 2014.

Tall Grasses, Stainless Steel, 25” h x 8” w x 6” d

We began our general understanding of Danish history at The Rosenborg Castle and gardens where the King Christian IV summerhouse was built in 1606. Since 1710 the castle has become the setting for the Royal Collections.  Several collections in the home reminded me of work that is being created by artists today.  For instance, a grouping of glass vases caused me to recall the 2014 Groot Foundation recipient, Beth Lipman.  I remember seeing her work, “Bancketje” for the first time at the Smithsonian.

The Treasury was located in the basement and housed the swords, guns and crowns.  The crowns were stunning, and one crown in particular had diamond encrusted skulls adorning it, instantly reminding me of Damien Hirsts’ diamond skull, “For the Love of God.”  

I love that a serene grouping of glass vases or diamond encrusted skulls continue to be strong imagery, handcrafted, housed in a special place, and arranged in a distinct way.  Whether in a Castle or at the Smithsonian, they might all just have the same meaning repeated over the centuries. We continue to place precious things on pedestals, the significance of the beauty of an object d’art seems not to have changed.

The Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek featured the personal collection of Carl Jacobsen.  The museum highlight for me was a large collection of small figurative Rodin sculptures.  Seeing the repetitive work made me feel not so kooky as I make these small pedestal pieces that are essentially the same form over and over again.

Copenhagen was a destination for us because of the cities ongoing investments into bike and pedestrian oriented infrastructure.  It was exceptionally easy to ride around the city and we quickly caught on to the informal biking dos and don’ts.  Starting in 1995, Copenhagen began to divert overflow drain’s from their harbor which has resulted in the building of swimming platforms in the downtown harbor area called Copenhagen Harbour Bath.  My favorite days were the days we jumped in (along with the hundreds of others) for a swim.

In noticing all of these amenities, there is actually a broader theme at work that makes these small moments pleasurable; Danish design.  It is in every thread of their culture, from the furniture in restaurants, pavement tile details to the swimming docks and areas designated for workouts.  For instance, the design of the diving platform off one of the docks was built with exaggerated lines creating fantastical slides and walkways. The workout area appeared as it was cut and formed out of one piece of thick gauge metal, flat with lines that careened or jumped from one place to the next.  Such fun design! While also being efficient as well as elegant.  I like that the design is considerate, it appears to be sensi-cal, and extremely thoughtful of the people that will be using it.

The stonework utilized in the squares were designed in a way to direct car, bike and pedestrian traffic, while retaining a decorative quality.  Russell was really enamored with this detail, and took hundreds of photos of pavers! But, it wasn’t until I was walking around my own neighborhood, after being home for quite awhile, that I looked down and noticed a hodge-podge of concrete, overlapped by some asphalt with a small strip of brick ‘trying’ to be decorative that I got it.  The ground we simply walk on can also be designed with intention, it makes a difference to the beauty of the urban landscape.

Here are our favorite chairs by Danish Designer Hans Wegner.The Danish Museum of Art & Design had an exhibition “Just One Good Chair” highlighting the chair designer Hans Wegner.  I enjoyed seeing the evolution of his design and the expanse of his prolific career.  After reading about a craftsman sanding the single arm of a chair for 100 hours, it was tempting to give said chair a try and feel how smooth it really was!  Taking this sort of time to retain such a high level of craftsmanship is the Danish approach to making furniture.Slowness is something that has been been embraced in the Danish furniture design industry and in the exhibit it was explained; “With their extraordinary quality and finish, Danish architect-designed furniture is intimately tied up with slowness. What is it that gives this furniture its perfect appearance? In addition to their artistic and functional design, such furniture is the result of a long process that involves painstaking selection and preparation of the wood as well as exquisite craftsmanship, evident in every joint, detail and surface.”

Here are our favorite chairs by Danish Designer Hans Wegner.

The Danish Museum of Art & Design had an exhibition “Just One Good Chair” highlighting the chair designer Hans Wegner.  I enjoyed seeing the evolution of his design and the expanse of his prolific career.  After reading about a craftsman sanding the single arm of a chair for 100 hours, it was tempting to give said chair a try and feel how smooth it really was!  Taking this sort of time to retain such a high level of craftsmanship is the Danish approach to making furniture.

Slowness is something that has been been embraced in the Danish furniture design industry and in the exhibit it was explained; “With their extraordinary quality and finish, Danish architect-designed furniture is intimately tied up with slowness. What is it that gives this furniture its perfect appearance? In addition to their artistic and functional design, such furniture is the result of a long process that involves painstaking selection and preparation of the wood as well as exquisite craftsmanship, evident in every joint, detail and surface.”

Remember when I posted about visiting the The Glass House last month? It turns out that Hans Wegner and Philip Johnson were contemporaries.  In coming full circle, it was interesting to learn that Johnson chose Wegner’s furniture for several of his projects.  Even though Wegner was an internationally known modernist designer, he still felt like a craftsman.  “I feel more like a craftsman than a designer,” Wegner once said: “I think more like a craftsman. And when I have doubts, I say to myself: What would you do if you were standing there with the materials? That’s why, when I have doubts, I also go to the workshop.  You definitely do this if you come to a place in the process of developing a chair…So I say What would you do as a craftsman…when you are standing with the materials in your hand? Then it becomes evident.”

Remember when I posted about visiting the The Glass House last month? It turns out that Hans Wegner and Philip Johnson were contemporaries.  In coming full circle, it was interesting to learn that Johnson chose Wegner’s furniture for several of his projects.  

Even though Wegner was an internationally known modernist designer, he still felt like a craftsman.  “I feel more like a craftsman than a designer,” Wegner once said: “I think more like a craftsman. And when I have doubts, I say to myself: What would you do if you were standing there with the materials? That’s why, when I have doubts, I also go to the workshop.  You definitely do this if you come to a place in the process of developing a chair…So I say What would you do as a craftsman…when you are standing with the materials in your hand? Then it becomes evident.”