GILLIAN

The Civic Space/ Public Art lecture at Northeastern last night was a look into completed projects on the Greenway in Boston.  Tim Love and Dina Dietsch spoke on public processes that were implemented for creating the Harbor Islands Ferry Pavilion while Nick Capasso forged a pilot program for introducing public art on the Greenway. 
Having just moved to Boston, this was a good introduction to how public art has been incorporated into the Greenway.  The lecture also offered good insight to the general dour attitudes expressed about how Boston commonly integrates ‘dumbed down’ public art into the cityscape.  It was refreshing to hear Capasso say, ” There is an expectation [from the public] that a 21st Century park has public art.”  If the public expects public art but we live in a process dependent city, how can we get the public art that is engaging but also edgy, daring or maybe controversial?

The Civic Space/ Public Art lecture at Northeastern last night was a look into completed projects on the Greenway in Boston.  Tim Love and Dina Dietsch spoke on public processes that were implemented for creating the Harbor Islands Ferry Pavilion while Nick Capasso forged a pilot program for introducing public art on the Greenway. 

Having just moved to Boston, this was a good introduction to how public art has been incorporated into the Greenway.  The lecture also offered good insight to the general dour attitudes expressed about how Boston commonly integrates ‘dumbed down’ public art into the cityscape.  It was refreshing to hear Capasso say, ” There is an expectation [from the public] that a 21st Century park has public art.”  If the public expects public art but we live in a process dependent city, how can we get the public art that is engaging but also edgy, daring or maybe controversial?

  1. gillianchristy posted this